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Human qualities like acceptance, empathy & respect are what matter most… Sarah Nelson

Welcome. This is the page for people who encounter survivors of sexual violence, and sexual violence issues, in their working lives.

 

You might be a professional, carer, practitioner or colleague. We use the term ‘workers’ to cover all the possibilities.

Survivors of sexual violence form a significant body of citizens in the UK. They are male and female, young and old, and they come from all ethnic backgrounds and socio-economic groups.

 

Approximately 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys are sexually abused in childhood. 23% of women and 6% of men are subjected to sexual violence in adulthood.

 

This means that workers across many occupations are more likely to act effectively and confidently if they have a good awareness of sexual violence issues and of the needs of survivors.

 

Of course, many workers are themselves survivors, or are close to survivors. This can give them extra insight into the issues but also place greater stress on them as they carry out work with others who have experienced sexual violence.

And even workers who aren’t survivors themselves, or close to them, may find themselves struggling to keep healthy boundaries or make a positive difference to others when they are working with these challenging issues.

 

Also, workers may encounter opportunities to contribute to the important work of preventing sexual violence.

 

These may arise while working with vulnerable clients or those at risk of perpetrating sexual violence, or when there is a chance to disseminate prevention advice in communities.

 

Essentially, workers need support, training and self-awareness to do the best job possible.

 

 

 

Video Links:

The door to adulthood

Saving Childhood Ryan - Dublin Rape Crisis Centre
Making Recovery a Reality - Rape Crisis Scotland
Rape Victims and Counselling
Rape Crisis: Helen Mirren
Congo's male rape victims speak out
Survival Story
Boys and Men Healing from male child sexual abuse
Esther Rantzen on the sexual abuse of boys by women